Cracked Windshield

Discussion in 'Clarity' started by bpratt, Jul 19, 2018.

  1. bpratt

    bpratt Active Member

    Traveling on the freeway a couple of days ago and something hit my windshield just left of the camera behind the mirror. By the time I got home the crack had gone up to the upper edge of the windshield and across the camera and then it turned and headed down the passenger side. When I priced the replacement cost I was shocked. The windshield cost is a little under $1100 plus another $400 for clips and brackets and parts to replace it. Another $200 for labor to replace it and $250 more to recalibrate the camera. Total cost around $1900 at a Honda dealer. I also had the all the windows tinted and I'm not sure whether I'll have to pay that myself or if my $500 deductible will also cover the front window tinting.
     
  2. PHEV Newbie

    PHEV Newbie Well-Known Member

    Ouch! Sorry to hear about that. All the windows are made of laminated acoustical glass to reduce noise and they are expensive as you've found. Indeed, if you take the time to learn about all the materials (nearly all the metal are aluminum or ultra high strength steel) and engineering details, that Honda must be losing thousands on each Clarity sold. Unfortunately, once more insurance claims are processed, insurers will learn that the Clarity is a far more expensive car than the list price indicates and our insurance may go up accordingly. On the other hand, Clarity drivers are the most intelligent, skillful, and courteous drivers that our ultra-low accident rate might keep that from happening!
     
    Robin likes this.
  3. Hobbesgsr

    Hobbesgsr Active Member

  4. Steven B

    Steven B Active Member

    All that article says is that because they had no repair history on the aluminized F150 version, the initial pricing was based on the less expensive steel versions of previous years. As the data rolls in on new models with new construction methods, insurance rates will better reflect the real cost. Honda's "Body Repair News" (File 30630) provides some key wording: https://insideevsforum.com/community/index.php?threads/technical-review-from-sae.2615/#post-22822

    "Steel repair and welding procedures vary, depending on the tensile strength of the parts involved." - Requiring varying methods is a cost driver (if followed correctly).
    "Do not apply heat to any body part during straightening. This may compromise the internal structure and strength of high-strength steel parts. Any part that has heat applied to it during straightening must be replaced with new parts." - Using a torch for direct heat application is likely a common repair practice but with high strength steels makes them too brittle. Unable to straighten members will lead to full replacement, again, IF THE REPAIR IS DONE CORRECTLY.
     
  5. jdonalds

    jdonalds Well-Known Member

    We had a very similar incident in our 2008 Prius in 2015. I was pleased that the dual pane acoustic windshield was only $347.
     
  6. insightman

    insightman Well-Known Member

    It's amazing how expensive some car parts are these days. It recalls a tale from my life 50 years ago (OK, so I'm a geezer).

    In 1968 I bought a 1961 Pontiac Tempest for $200. That Tempest was the Chevy Corvair's secret brother; it was the brainchild of one John DeLorean. Unlike the Corvair, the Tempest had its 4-cylinder (Iron Duke) engine up front, but like the Corvair, the transmission was in the rear, connected to the engine by a flexible "rope drive" shaft. This newfangled Tempest also had a strange and special windshield that was mounted differently than on most 1960's cars. One day I came out and someone had thrown a brick through the windshield. The cost to replace that special windshield was more than I paid for the car, so it was totaled. I replaced it with a $180 Austin-Healey 100-6 that came with flower-shaped Gene McCarthy for President stickers on the fender. I should have fixed the Tempest.

    Some day years from now, when the 2018 Honda Clarity's value has waned and replacement windshields are rare, a rock through the windshield will total a Honda Clarity.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2018
    Texas22Step likes this.
  7. bfd

    bfd Active Member

    Cars now have so many technological features that they're more like computers on wheels. So it's no wonder that even a fender bender can cost big $$$. Bump into something like a trash can with your side view mirror with camera? Another chunk of change. Windshields are especially tough because the glass has to be optically clean. You can get a less expensive windshield repair, but you won't be able to recalibrate the internal cameras - making your system worthless. At least the Clarity doesn't have sensors in the bumpers. That's another chunk of cash that people don't consider when bumping into something. We're not just replacing a bumper cover anymore…
     
  8. insightman

    insightman Well-Known Member

    I doubt a car as rare as the Clarity will have third-party windshield manufacturers rushing to make replacements.
     
  9. bpratt

    bpratt Active Member

    Don't know about now but there were no third-party windshield manufacturers when I had my windshield replaced last July. By the way the final cost was slightly over $2100.
     

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