LEAF to Home V2H

Discussion in 'LEAF' started by jim, Dec 27, 2017.

  1. jim

    jim Member

    I had missed it in the news about the 2018 LEAF Nissan wants to introduce the USA to V2H like they have been using in Japan for about as year. This is really big news. No other automaker has been talking about V2G Vehicle To GRID. In fact Tesla doesn't want to do V2G since they sell the Power Wall for that purpose.

    Here's a quote from Nissan.
    https://insideevs.com/nissan-leaf-t...-will-be-nissans-primary-focus-at-2017-naias/

    QUOTE=The major takeaways from the press release is that Nissan is working hard to commercialize this LEAF-To-Home system in the U.S. Nissan states:

    “Nissan is heavily focused on preparing for “LEAF-to-Home” commercialization in the U.S., similar to what is available on the market in Japan today. In 2012, Nissan introduced this system in Japan, allowing drivers to supply a house with the energy stored in a Nissan LEAF battery. By charging the vehicle at night when electricity is cheaper and powering a household during the day, the system assists in alleviating power consumption during peak periods when demand is highest and most expensive. It can also be used as a backup power supply for blackouts and emergencies. Today about 4,000 households in Japan are utilizing their EVs to manage home energy use, and hundreds of EVs are powering buildings in Japan and Europe.”
     
  2. jim

    jim Member

    Nissan might be focused on this but I never hear anything about V2H. I still hope to do a test pilot of this in the HOT greater Phoenix area. Over 50% of the plugin drivers in our Phoenix Electric Auto Association have Solar so why not use V2H?
     
  3. ArkansasVolt

    ArkansasVolt New Member

    Only thing I can think of is the fear of lawsuits in America is real.


    2011 Chevy Volt;
    2018 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid
     
  4. Pushmi-Pullyu

    Pushmi-Pullyu Active Member

    Using your BEV's battery pack as an emergency backup, to power your house in case of a blackout, may make sense, altho it requires a more expensive two-way charger inside the car.

    What makes absolutely no sense is to cycle your BEV's battery pack unnecessarily, on a daily basis; using the BEV's pack instead of a stationary home storage battery pack. A BEV's battery pack is optimized to power a car, not to power a house. Batteries used in stationary storage packs can be and should be cheaper batteries than are used in BEVs.

    If your local utility wants to use expensive BEV battery packs as grid storage, then let them pay for their own battery packs -- not use yours! It's unlikely your local utility would pay you a fair market price for using your BEV as their backup power source. If it was worth the price, then they would simply buy their own batteries. The only reason they'd want to use your batteries is because they think they can rent them cheaply, at below market value.

    Now, there is an argument to be made for BEV owners letting the local utility use their BEV's battery pack only in emergencies, to prevent a blackout. But again, that would require the BEV to have a more expensive two-way charger built in. Is the utility gonna pay for that? Of course they're not! So why should you pay more for something which will only benefit them?

    What does make sense is "smart charging", and letting the local utility decide what hours your BEV will charge during the night. What does not make sense is wearing out your battery pack prematurely to benefit the local utility.

    V2G <> smart charging.
     
  5. ArkansasVolt

    ArkansasVolt New Member

    What makes the most sense to me is off grid solar with batteries. :)


    2011 Chevy Volt;
    2018 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid
     
  6. Pushmi-Pullyu

    Pushmi-Pullyu Active Member

    I see a lot of people talking about wanting to do that. However, I haven't seen anyone saying they've actually done it. Not saying nobody has; surely someone somewhere has done that? I'm just saying it must be very rare.

    All the articles/reports I've seen online about off-grid solar have been about a cabin somewhere far away from civilization, with no local access to the electrical grid. In other words, those who are off-grid by necessity rather than by choice, and only for some sort of vacation cabin or hunting cabin used only a small part of the year, not their actual residence.
     
  7. ArkansasVolt

    ArkansasVolt New Member

    I live in rural Arkansas. It's not that rare around here.


    2011 Chevy Volt;
    2018 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid
     

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