Fisker

Discussion in 'Other EVs' started by Domenick, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

  2. Apexerman

    Apexerman New Member

    I admire Fisker's ambitions and design sensibilities, but his last EV project didn't persevere in the marketplace, so it's hard to say how far this one will go. It's certainly beautiful. Time will tell.
     
  3. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    If you read the comments in that piece, you'll find lots of cynicism. While understandable, I personally think his chances are much better with this all-electric approach than the Karma PHEV. The system is inherently easier to implement and he's had the experience of starting an auto company now, so he should benefit from the lessons taught by the failures of the first project.
     
  4. Pushmi-Pullyu

    Pushmi-Pullyu Active Member

    Well, it's certainly true that it should be easier to engineer a reliable BEV powertrain than a reliable PHEV powertrain, because the PHEV uses two very different powertrains which must be seamlessly integrated. However, given the notoriously large number of problems, both electrical/electronic and mechanical, with Fisker's previous car, the Fisker Karma, it certainly seems to be prudent to be highly skeptical that this new car is going to be reliable.

    For example, to be snarky, those rear doors leave one yearning for the elegant simplicity of the Tesla Model S falcon-wing doors! ;)

    Yes, it looks very nice. A lot of people think the Fisker Karma looks nice, too. (I'm not one of them, but to each his own.) The question is whether this car will perform as well as it looks, or whether that slick-looking exterior design is just lipstick on a pig.

    Still, I say good luck to Fisker in his new endeavor. We should at least admire his persistence, his refusal to give up!
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    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018 at 3:28 PM
    Domenick likes this.
  5. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    Yeah, we wrote about this Fisker flexible solid state battery >here<. There are a number of efforts to make a solid-state battery, many with great claims about both energy and power density. Just need one to be commercialized to change the world.
     
  6. Pushmi-Pullyu

    Pushmi-Pullyu Active Member

    I certainly hope that within a few/several years, BEVs will get down to a recharge time of, let's say, 6-8 minutes. Even if batteries are produced that can support 1-minute charging, it's not reasonable to think that any auto maker would mass produce a car which has charge plugs/ports, wiring, fuses, etc. robust enough to support a 1-minute charge. Heavy copper cables and bus bars are more expensive than thinner ones. Nor is it reasonable to think any company building an EV charging station would install one which could mostly or fully charge a BEV in only 1 minute. The cost would be prohibitive, not only for the infrastructure but also for that level of electric power delivered to the charger.

    If you're on the road and you stop for a charge during a long trip, you'll likely want to at least visit the bathroom while the car charges. So there isn't much of a practical reason to have less than a ~5 minute charge. Any shorter time would be largely a waste of money, both on the part of the auto maker and the charging station. Furthermore, if the charging station has an adjacent convenience store, as most gas stations currently do, then the owner is going to want to give you time to go in and buy a soda and a snack. A 1-minute charge would discourage that.
     
  7. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    Great video with Autoblog's Jeremy Korzeniewski talking about, and showing the car at CES.

    Some interesting comments about the size of the interior. Not mentioned is something I heard yesterday about -- the rear doors may get normal hinges in production.

     

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