2019 Jaguar I-Pace gets official 234-mile range rating

Discussion in 'I-Pace' started by TeslaInvestors, Oct 23, 2018.

  1. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web Well-Known Member Subscriber

    It remains a puzzle with current speculation about the tires and suspension. You might have noticed the I-Pace reveal included a lot of rough terrain climbing which is typically done with 'knobby tires.' High rolling resistance tires, rough terrain transfer cases, and suspensions tuned for rock climbing (excessive toe and camber) may be the root cause.

    Bob Wilson
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
  2. TeslaInvestors

    TeslaInvestors Active Member

    Ah, that's interesting. These may attract a slightly different kind of buyers, one who doesn't focus just on EPA range and is also interested in off road activities.
     
  3. interestedinEV

    interestedinEV Active Member

    The I-Pace appear to begin with a bang and appears to be ending up in a whimper. They started off with a range of 270 miles plus, the road tests by users seem to indicate more like 200 miles. Jaguar may have done some optimization and brought it to 234. Even on other performance parameters it does not seem to be better than the Tesla S. Unfortunately for Jaguar, they have no room for error, as it will be compared against the S. The only saving grace is that you will get the $7500 tax incentive after Jan 1st, Tesla will come down to $3750. I had high hopes for the I-Pace, the news coming out does not indicate it is a Tesla killer. Their only hope is to attract the people who focus on off road (as mentioned by @TeslaInvestors ) and the never Tesla folks.
     
  4. TeslaInvestors

    TeslaInvestors Active Member

    Well, we got to be careful here. EPA range doesn't mean its like some gold standard measured by a neutral party. Most of it is measured by the manufacturer itself. As we know, Tesla's range claims are on the optimistic side while Bolt (and also SparkEV before that) have been quite conservative. See consumer reports' range test with Bolt for proof.

    https://greentransportation.info/ev-charging/range-confidence/chap5-ev-range/epa-estimates.html
    Ultimately, if a manufacturer claims overoptimistic ranges that leads to a consumer lawsuit, the manufacturer loses face and eats crow. So a manufacturer who wants to stay in business long term and build customer loyalty may want to play it safe.
    As an example, see this long range Model 3 owner already realizing that Tesla's range claim was a fraud. Tesla might have put on the thinnest of tires with low rolling resistance and driven on he days with best weather in California on an easy route. This jibes well with other similar things they have done regarding everythign from claims of cost savings to FSD to AP 2.0 to horse power numbers of P85D.
    m3_range.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
  5. DucRider

    DucRider New Member

    EPA tests are done in a lab under controlled conditions, not on the road. Application for the Model 3 long range with full details:
    https://iaspub.epa.gov/otaqpub/display_file.jsp?docid=40001&flag=1

    In five cycle testing, the Model 3 achieved 371 miles of range. The standard derating of .7 takes that to 334 which Tesla then voluntarily lowered to 310.

    Interesting to note that a full charge took 89.4 kWh, which indicates an ~80 kWh battery is likely fitted in the LR (as opposed to the widely reported 75)
     
    Domenick likes this.
  6. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    That tweet is ridiculous, though reading through his tweets, it's hard to tell if he' serious or sarcastic. He's driving 80-85 miles an hour with stickier tires than stock and then saying that his range has dropped.
     
    Jack likes this.
  7. interestedinEV

    interestedinEV Active Member

    Does this suggest that I-Pace should actually get around 170 miles in real life, if EPA is 234 miles? That will really put I-pace out of business.


    Unfortunately one person who is off the wall becomes a poster child for nay sayers.
     
    Domenick likes this.
  8. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    I wouldn't take one vehicle's results to make an inference on another. I imagine the I-Pace will get over 200 miles for most, and close to its EPA numbers when driven slightly conservatively.
     
  9. TeslaInvestors

    TeslaInvestors Active Member

    Thanks for the info. Still, some makers seem to put out more conservative numbers. How do you explain that?
    Are they deliberately putting lower numbers just to avoid negative publicity when real life range turns out lower?

    Like here is Chevy Bolt vs, Model S 75. I assume, CR knows what it is doing. Article claims, EPA range is under almost ideal conditions that are hard to replicate in real life? I am not sure if that's true or not.

    https://insideevsforum.com/communit...ace-gets-official-234-mile-range-rating.3626/
    Here is how CR tests electric car range.
    https://www.consumerreports.org/hybrids-evs/how-we-test-range-of-electric-vehicles/
     
  10. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web Well-Known Member Subscriber

    CR reports two MPG numbers, their test track and highway numbers. Their highway numbers are spot-on with the EPA metrics but their track numbers are consistently worse for high MPG cars like the Prius.

    Bob Wilson
     

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